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Myler HBT Shank Ported Barrel MB 33 5" Bit

Our Price: $104.95 MSRP: $121.95 - You Save: $17.00
Bit Performance Characteristics

minimal maximum

Leverage

Leverage

The term "leverage" refers to the action of the lever components of a shank cheek piece, which magnifies the pressure of the rider's hands to create additional force on the mouthpiece. This mechanical advantage allows the rider to give a stronger signal with less rein pressure. The amount of force the leverage action creates is determined by the ratio of the shank length to the purchase length. A bit with a shank twice as long as the purchase (or a ratio of 2:1) will apply twice as much force on the mouthpiece than the pressure applied on the rein by the rider's hand. Bits with higher ratios of shank to purchase length maximize use of leverage to create more magnification of the pressure of the rein on the horse's mouth.

Snaffle cheek pieces (loose rings, eggbutts and D-rings) create direct rein action and do not incorporate leverage to increase pressure on the mouthpiece. Riding Warehouse bits are assessed by the amount of leverage incorporated by the design components of each bit.

Palatability

Palatability

Several materials are used in bit construction to increase the palatable qualities of the bit so the horse will more easily accept the bit. Common metals include copper, sweet iron, German silver, and specialized alloys such as Herm Sprenger's AURIGAN® that oxidize when exposed to moisture to release a sweet taste and smell to increase salivation and bit acceptance. Synthetic materials such as rubber and plastic may feature flavors in addition to a softer feel that some horses find more appealing than metals. Riding Warehouse bits are assessed by the amount and type of palatable materials used on the mouthpiece of each bit.

Severity

Severity

Remember: any bit can be harsh in the wrong hands. Riding Warehouse bits are assessed by the combination of structural and functional components of each bit. Certain features are designed to create a more "harsh" feeling pressure for more immediate responses, including twisted mouthpiece bars or correctional center joints. Combined with functional aspects of the cheek piece, specifically the addition of leverage, these structural features can lead to a higher severity rating of the overall bit design.

Disciplines

Disciplines

Let us start by saying that all bits are universal - we've seen riders choose bit styles for their horses based from a variety of different factors, no matter their competitive discipline or general riding style. First and foremost, bit selection should be based on your horse's needs; discipline style selection should be considered secondarily.

The disciplines we feature on our Bit Selection Guide represent the most popular riding styles for which each bit is most commonly used, but don't let that stop you from trying the bit you think your horse needs if your particular discipline is not listed! If you have any questions or concerns, feel free to call our friendly and knowledgeable customer service team (1.800.620.9145) to discuss your thoughts before making a purchase.

Pressure Points

Pressure Points

Depending on the design and functional components, a bit can create several areas of pressure to initiate a variety of responses. More simple bit styles, such as the loose ring snaffle, can only apply pressure in certain areas of the horse's mouth. Complex bit styles such as combination bits or correctional bits can be adjusted to incorporate several pressure points to achieve the desired response for specific training or riding styles.

Bars

Bars

The bars refer to the bony ridges of the gums in front of the horse's molars where the bit rests in the horse's mouth. Depending on the horse's oral anatomy, these ridges can feel sharp and be very sensitive to bit pressure. Alternatively, some horse's tongues cover this area and prevent the bit from creating uncomfortable pressure on the bars.

Lips

Lips

Any bit style that sits in the horse's mouth will feature joints where the mouthpiece and cheek pieces come together. Most all mouthpieces will create lip pressure by design, and some cheek piece styles may effect lip pressure for various reasons. For example, full cheek bits incorporate more lip pressure to encourage a response.

Nose/Chin

Nose/Chin

The noseband and curb strap are often used simultaneously to create pressure points to achieve the desired response from bit action. Most curb bits, hackamores, and combination bits incorporate various combinations of nose and/or chin pressure to balance the leverage effects of the cheek piece. Creating various points of pressure allows the horse to experience several chances to feel the bit action and provide the desired response from rein pressure.

Palate

Palate

A horse's palate can vary in shape and height and may or may not be affected by different mouthpiece styles. It can be helpful to assess your horse's palate to determine what mouthpiece styles may be best for your horse. Certain ported bits are designed to incorporate palate pressure to achieve immediate response, as the palate is a very sensitive area. As such, bits that create palate pressure should be chosen carefully to prevent excess pain or discomfort. Not all ported bits are designed to create palate pressure, so be sure to read the descriptions carefully to determine which mouthpiece style would best suit your horse and training needs.

Poll

Poll

Many bit styles incorporate poll pressure through the use of a fixed ring (purchase) to attach the headstall or bridle. When the rein pulls back on the cheek piece, the purchase tips forward, pulling the headstall with it and creating pressure at the horse's poll. Traditionally, poll pressure should encourage the horse to lower the head in response, creating less resistance against the bit for more consistent communication through the rein.

Tongue

Tongue

The horse's tongue is thought to be one of the most sensitive areas of the horse's body. Applying pressure to the tongue has proven to be very effective for communicative control of the horse. Jointed mouthpieces are designed to collapse onto the tongue and apply specific pressure to certain areas to initiate a response, whereas mullen mouthpieces (without any joints) apply a general pressure across the entire tongue. Several mullen mouthpieces feature ports that allow for "tongue relief" and are designed to limit pressure applied to the tongue and allow space for swallowing. Ported mouthpieces are generally recommended for more seasoned, responsive horses.

Quantity
Availability
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The Low, Medium Wide Ported Barrel mouthpiece featured on the Myler HBT Shank MB 33 5" Ported Bit is the mildest Myler mouthpiece in terms of tongue pressure. Because this mouthpiece does not rotate onto the tongue and the port is wide, it applies little to no tongue pressure, working primarily off the bars, lips, chin and poll of the horse.

This is a Level 3 Myler Bit. Due to the high degree of tongue relief offered, this mouthpiece is appropriate for an experienced rider with a horse that has a trustworthy and consistent disposition and is trained to work off the leg and seat as well as hands.

Features:

  • Round Stainless Steel, Angled 5" HBT Shank - Mild Leverage
  • Patented Independent Swivel Cheek Purchase
  • Copper Inlay on Inside of Bars to Encourage Salivation
  • 7/16" Bars Shaped in Pronounced Curve to Allow Comfortable Swallowing
  • 1 1/2" Low, Medium Wide Port for Maximum Tongue Relief
  • Sweet Iron Mouthpiece- Oxidizes with Moisture, Releasing Sweet Taste

 

Sizing:InchesMillimeters
Full Cheek Length 5 3/4" 146mm
Shank Length 3" 76mm
Purchase Length 1 1/2" 38mm
Mouth Thickness 3/8" 10mm
Center Link 7/8" x 1/2" 22mm x 12mm
Rein Ring Diameter 1" 25mm

** Please Note: A Myler bit will normally measure 1/8” larger than the stated size because the Myler's believe that the bit should have at least 1/8” to 1/4” of bit on either side of the mouth.  

Designed with true Myler philosophy, this bit incorporates ergonomic design features and Independent Side Movement™ to better accommodate the natural anatomy of the horse's mouth and deliver clear, well-balanced cues from the rider.

For more information about the benefits of the Myler design, see the "Product Details" tab.

If you have any further questions regarding all of our bit options and what bit would best suit your horse, feel free to call one of our knowledgeable customer service representatives at 800-620-9145! Or, check out the Myler's book, The Level Best for Your Horse, a complete step-by-step guide to finding and using the right bit for your horse!

You can also check out our Bit Returns Program!

Shank Design and Leverage:

With a mild degree of leverage, this HBT shank bit provides an indirect curb rein action designed to be used with a curb strap attached to the purchase. The broken mouthpiece featured on this bit will apply slightly more pressure to the tongue than a traditional curb bit; however, the combination of the fixed cheek and fixed rein apply mild pressure to the bars of the mouth, chin and poll in the traditional curb bit fashion.

The Independent Swivel Cheek purchase is a patented Myler feature that allows the purchase of the bit to be independently attached to the mouthpiece and the shank.  When the rider engages one rein, the shank moves and the purchase has a slight swivel in order to prevent pressing directly into the horse's face as the bit moves below it.

The 5" shank length is well suited for trail riding, as the shorter shank makes grazing easier!

Ergonomic Design:

The unique curved bars of all Myler bits are ergonomically designed to accommodate the natural anatomy of the horse's mouth, wrapping the bars and lips instead of pinching as the mouthpiece rotates onto the tongue. This curved design also provides significantly more space for the horse's tongue underneath the bit, allowing the horse to comfortably swallow when the reins are not engaged.

The generously wide port of this mouthpiece allows ample room for the tongue to pass under the bit and swallow, and the medium 1 1/2" height applies little to no palate pressure. 

Independent Side Movement:

The barrel at the center of the mouthpiece is not a roller, but rather a bushing that allows each side of the bit to move independently of the other. When the rider engages one rein on a traditional bit, the entire mouthpiece moves, creating a confusing signal for the horse. In comparison, when the rider engages one fixed rein using a Myler bit with ISM, the rider lifts only one side of the bit, giving a very clear, precise signal to the horse. 

Myler Philosophy:

The creators of Myler Bits, Ron, Dale and Bob Myler, offer this philosophy behind each of their bits: The bit is a communication tool between the horse and rider, and in order to effectively communicate with the horse, the rider needs a bit which allows the horse to be relaxed. Keeping this in mind, the Myler Bitting System is based on the concept of tongue relief. Distributing tongue pressure more evenly than rival designs, Myler's unique designs offer varying degrees of tongue relief for the horse depending on his level of training and his disposition. These degrees are identified by the "Level" noted for each bit.

Other Items in Myler Level 3 Bits

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